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Elasto Proxy

  • Rubber Gate Seal for Water Filtration System Lasts Longer, Resists Disinfection, Adds Business Value

    Water Filtration Case StudyWhen a manufacturer of water filtration systems needed a rubber gate seal that would last longer and resist ultraviolet (UV) light, Elasto Proxy provided a value-added solution. This custom gasket doesn’t just resist exposure to water, contact with metal and concrete, and disinfection with UV light. The gate seal also supports ease-of-installation and is ready to ship from Elasto Proxy’s warehouse in Newmarket, Ontario.

    The 60-durometer EPDM lip seal (J-seal) that Elasto Proxy provides attaches to the bottom of a metal gate used in water treatment facilities. This rubber seal is also compressed against hard concrete floors and exposed to a range of temperatures. UV disinfection kills waterborne microbes that can make people sick, but ultraviolet light can also degrade rubber materials. Without reliable sealing and strong bonding, gaskets like this can’t meet business or technical requirements.

    To provide a complete sealing solution, Elasto Proxy leveraged its expertise in seal design, material selection, custom fabrication, warehousing, and logistics. Continue reading

  • Cold Bonding for Rubber Gaskets

    Cold BondingCold bonding for rubber gaskets joins lengths of material without the use of heat. This bonding technique doesn’t require low-temperature conditions, but is called “cold” because no heat is applied to the gasket. By contrast, hot splicing requires either a conventional heat source or infrared (IR) light. Vulcanization and molded corners for rubber gaskets also involve heating gasket materials.

    With cold bonding, an adhesive is applied to the ends of the lengths that will be joined together. Different types of bonding systems are available, including compounds that vary in terms of viscosity, chemistry, and material properties. Cold bonding for rubber gaskets can save time and eliminate tooling costs, but engineers need a complete understanding of this joining method before choosing glued gaskets. Continue reading

  • Molded Corners for Rubber Gaskets

    Molded Corners for Rubber GasketsMolded corners for rubber gaskets are recommended for applications that require rounded joints, the ability to withstand stretching, or high cycle times. Molding is more expensive than hot splicing or vulcanization, but it’s the only way to create radisued corners. C-press injection molding, a bonding method for rubber gaskets, is ideal for low-to-medium volume quantities but suitable only for solid profiles.

    By understanding how C-press injection molding works and the advantages that molded corners provide, engineers can make strong decisions about gasket fabrication. In this article, the second in a series from Elasto Proxy, we’ll continue our coverage of joining methods. Next week’s content, the last in our series, will examine cold bonding. Continue reading

  • Hot Splicing and Vulcanizing for Rubber Gaskets

    Hot Splicing

    Hot splicing and vulcanizing for rubber gaskets are bonding techniques that use heat, pressure, and a film splice or uncured rubber to join the ends of profiles. Hot splicing uses thin polyethylene (PE) film and either a conventional heating source or infrared (IR) light. Vulcanization uses an uncured rubber compound, along with heat and pressure. Both hot splicing and vulcanization create chemical bonds at the molecular level.

    For engineers, choosing a splicing method for rubber gaskets is an important manufacturing decision. By balancing costs against capabilities, you can get the sealing and insulation solutions that you really need.  Traditional hot splicing, infrared or IR splicing, and vulcanization all have their advantages, but they also have their differences. In this article, the first in a series from Elasto Proxy, we’ll examine each of these bonding techniques in detail. Future articles will cover molded corners and cold bonding. Continue reading

  • Flame Retardant Rubber for Vehicle Interiors and Electronic Enclosures

    Flame Retardant RubberFlame retardant rubber helps to protect people and property from the devastating effects of fire. By stopping or slowing the spread of flame, these elastomers reduce the rate and intensity of burning. They can also limit the release of smoke and toxins while increasing the amount of time that people have to escape from life-threatening situations. Applications for these specialized compounds include electronic enclosures and the interiors of buses, trains, and subways.

    For engineers, it’s important to understand that all flame retardant rubber is not the same. There are different classes of flame retardants, chemicals that are added or applied during compounding. There are also different flammability standards by industry and within the same industry. For example, the mass transit industry has so many different flame, smoke, and toxicity (FST) standards that simply asking for an “FST compound” or “flame retardant rubber” risks getting you the wrong material. Continue reading

  • FDA Gasket Materials for Food Contact Applications

    FDA Gasket MaterialsFDA gasket materials are used in food contact applications such as commercial kitchens. They meet strict standards from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a regulatory agency that’s responsible for protecting the public health by ensuring the safety and quality of many food products. The FDA’s jurisdiction is limited to the United States, but FDA standards are followed worldwide.

    FDA gasket materials for food contact applications are subjected to rigorous testing. They are non-toxic, non-marking, non-allergenic, and reliable over a wide range of temperatures. These compounds are also tasteless, odorless, and resistant to the natural growth of bacteria. Not all food-grade rubber is FDA approved, however, so it’s important to choose gasket materials with care. Continue reading

  • NSF Gasket Materials for Food Equipment and Drinking Water Systems

    NSF Gasket MaterialsNSF gasket materials are used in commercial food service equipment, water treatment or distribution systems, and other applications that can affect human health and safety. Rubber compounds that are registered with NSF International (formerly the National Sanitary Foundation) must pass rigorous tests to ensure that potentially harmful substances won’t migrate from the gasket material when in contact with food or drinking water.

    NSF standards aren’t regulatory requirements, but failing to use NSF gasket materials can put larger product designs at risk. Conversely, using NSF certified compounds can increase the likelihood of regulatory acceptance. In some jurisdictions, public authorities such as health departments require food service equipment and drinking water systems to meet a specific NSF standard. Buyers also expect to see an NSF mark on products such as commercial ovens or water filtration systems. Continue reading

  • UL Gasket Materials for Flame Resistance and Ingress Protection

    UL Gasket MaterialsUL gasket materials can provide flame resistance, ingress protection, or other specialized properties. For engineers, it’s important to understand what the different standards from Underwriters Laboratories (UL) mean. It’s also worth knowing if UL gasket materials are truly required in your component-level designs. Otherwise, you may “over-engineer” your gaskets and pay too much for materials.

    Compared to commodity elastomers, the prices for UL compounds are higher. The minimum order quantities (MOQs) are greater, too. In the case of rubber extrusions, the compounder has to use special tooling to account for different flow rates. The number of suppliers who offer UL materials is also limited. Unless you really need them, UL gasket materials can add unnecessary expenses to your application.

    Of course, some sealing and insulation projects require UL gasket materials to meet specific requirements. In this blog entry, the first in our September series about compound selection, Elasto Proxy explains what engineers need to know about UL gaskets for flame resistance and ingress protection. These aren’t the only UL standards for gaskets, but they’re the most common – and they can be confusing. Continue reading

  • How to Install Bulb Trim Seals

    Bulb Trim SealsBulb trim seals keep out air, water, dust, and noise. They are used in doors with radiused corners and consist of a compressible bulb and a solid retainer section. When the door is closed, the bulb is compressed to create a seal between the door and the jam. The trim or solid retainer section installs over the edge of the door and combines a finished appearance with edge protection. Applications for bulb trim seals include mobile equipment and enclosures for electronics and machinery.

    In this “How to” article from Elasto Proxy, you’ll learn how to install bulb trim seals so that they won’t over-compress or kink. First, you’ll learn about materials and measurements for the bulb section. You’ll then learn how to specify the trim section of your seal. Along the way, we’ll cover some calculations and best practices for ordering and installing the industrial rubber products that you need. Bulb trim seals are sold in coils, but they also come cut-to-length to help you speed installation. Continue reading

  • How to Install Locking Gaskets

    Locking GasketsLocking gaskets are lengths of rubber that lock into place to provide a secure seal between stationary glass and a body panel. These rubber gaskets are used with the windows and windshields on mobile equipment such as trains, trucks, and buses. They’re also used with the viewing windows on enclosures for machines, instruments, and equipment. Additional applications include boat windows, clean rooms, and the windows used in high-traffic doors found in warehouses.

    In this “How to” article from Elasto Proxy, you’ll learn how to install locking gaskets properly – and without risking breakage to windows or windshields. We’ll start with measurements and material selection, and consider the advantages of buying rubber gaskets that are already cut-to-size. Most importantly, you’ll learn some installation tips and best practices that can save you time while helping to avoid damage to body panels. Continue reading

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