Stop the Noise with Custom Acoustic Insulation

Custom Acoustic InsulationCustom acoustic insulation absorbs, transmits, or redirects sound waves – vibrations in the air that pass-through objects and result in audible sound. Noise, or unwanted sound, is measured in decibels (dB) and has a specific frequency distribution that’s measured in Hertz (Hz).

Unlike some noise control products, custom acoustic insulation can be “tuned” to address specific frequencies. Examples include the low-frequency rumble of a big diesel engine and high-frequency sounds like squeaking and squealing.

Custom insulation can strengthen product designs, but engineers need to know which questions to ask and what types of solutions are available. In this introductory article, you’ll learn about the basic elements of noise control. You’ll also learn about the basic types of acoustical materials and how they’re fabricated. (more…)

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Noise Control and Acoustic Insulation: Sound Sources and Frequencies

Noise Control and Acoustic InsulationAcoustic insulation absorbs, transmits, or redirects sound – a form of energy that travels in waves. Unwanted sounds, or noise, aren’t just unpleasant to hear. They can harm human health, jeopardize worker safety, and contribute to structural fatigue. The consequences of noise can be severe, but its characteristics are sometimes misunderstood.

In Part 1 of this series, Elasto Proxy shared a surprising example of two machines running at different decibel (dB) levels in the same room. In Part 2, we’ll examine some other sources of noise in the industries we serve. Importantly, you’ll learn why acoustic insulation must account for more than just a sound’s source. Frequency, the speed of the change of the sound, is a key design consideration for noise control. (more…)

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Acoustic Insulation: What You Need to Know About Noise

Acoustic InsulationAcoustic insulation absorbs, transmits, or redirects sound – a form of energy that travels in waves. Some sounds are pleasant to hear, but others can harm human health, endanger workers, or contribute to structural fatigue. Undesirable sounds, or noise, have characteristics that designers of acoustic insulation need to understand. Without this knowledge, noise problems can cause design-related headaches.

In Part 1 of this series from Elasto Proxy, you’ll learn about the consequences of noise and discover why its characteristics might not be what you think. You’ll also consider why decibel-level differences in noise sources matter. Then, in Part 2, we’ll examine sound measurements and noise control in greater detail. Along the way, we invite you to contact us with your questions about acoustic insulation. (more…)

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Rubber Floor Mats for Mobile Equipment

Rubber Floor MatsRubber floor mats for mobile equipment protect the cabin floor, support employee safety, and provide acoustic insulation. The metal flooring that’s used inside the cab is strong and durable, but operators track mud, snow, dirt, and water inside. Rubber floor mats protect these metal surfaces and help reduce slip-and-fall hazards. Rubber flooring that’s laminated to acoustic insulation also helps to absorb noise from the engine compartment, which is often directly below the cab where the operator sits.

Unlike carpeting, rubber floor matting won’t stain. Rubber is also easier-to-clean and offers greater wear resistance than fabric. In a mobile equipment cab, an operator’s feet may remain in the same position for extended periods of time. With carpet floor mats, heel wear can cause holes in the fabric. This exposes the subfloor, introduces a potential safety hazard, and provides a path for engine sounds. Rubber flooring can also be used as a kick-plate to protect cab walls from contact with an operator’s boots. (more…)

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Gensets: Door Seals, Acoustic Insulation, and Rubber Bumpers

GensetsGensets or generating sets are designed to supply off-grid electricity. They usually consist of a diesel or gasoline-powered engine and an electrical generator (such as an alternator) that converts mechanical power into electricity. Some gensets, such as the ones that provide emergency backup power at hospitals and water treatment plants, are large and stationary. Others gensets are portable because they’re wheeled, or are mounted on wheeled trailers that are pulled by trucks or other motorized vehicles. (more…)

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Sound Barriers for Acoustic Insulation

Sound BarriersElasto Proxy explains what engineers need to consider when choosing sound barriers.  This article is the third in a multi-part series about acoustic insulation.

Sound barriers are soundproofing materials that reflect little or no noise. They usually contain dense but flexible mats and one or more layers of acoustical foams such as melamine. Various facing materials are also used for attenuation, protection, and decoration. Sound barriers are designed to achieve maximum attenuation over a broad frequency range, but they can impart other important properties. For example, some sound barriers offer resistance to fire and fluids. Other emit low levels of smoke while burning. (more…)

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Sound Absorption and Acoustic Insulation

sound absorptionElasto Proxy explains what engineers need to know about choosing sound absorption materials for acoustic insulation.

Part 1 of this series examined three components of sound (source, path, and receiver) and three types of acoustic insulation (absorbers, barriers, and dampers). Part 2 takes a closer look at sound absorbers, a type of acoustic insulation that’s used both at the source of the sound and at the receiver.

By applying the information in this article, engineers can choose the right sound absorbing materials for applications such as aerospace, defense, infrastructure, mobile equipment, and stainless steel and food equipment. (more…)

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Sound Transmission Class (STC) and Acoustic Insulation

sound transmission classSound transmission class (STC) describes the ability of a product or material to stop the transmission of airborne sound. Since the 1960s, STC ratings have been used to describe the acoustical properties of ceilings, walls, floors, and doors. Today, STC values are provided for acoustic insulation made from a single material, and for multi-layer composites that are sandwiched together. Higher STC numbers are generally better, but there are exceptions to this rule – and other factors to consider as well.

In this article from Elasto Proxy, you’ll learn what STC is and how it’s measured. For starters, we’ll cover some basic concepts about sound, vibrations that travel through the air or another medium (such as a wall) and can be heard by the human ear. Along the way, it’s important to remember that sound can also be reflected inward (such as within a metal enclosure) and cause vibrations. So while preventing the transmission of unwanted sound (noise) is important, you may face other design challenges, too. (more…)

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Military Vehicles Need Thermal Acoustic Insulation

Military Vehicles

Thermal acoustic insulation is used in the floors, doors, side panels, and engine bays of military vehicles. Many different types of insulating materials are available, but you don’t need to be a material scientist to make the right choice. By choosing an experienced custom-fabricator who provides design assistance and help with material selection, you can strengthen your product designs as well as your supply chain. That’s why the North American defense industry asks Elasto Proxy for thermal acoustic solutions. (more…)

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