Cold Bonding vs. Injection Molding for Finished Gaskets

Finished Gaskets - BlogCold bonding for finished gaskets joins cut lengths of rubber without the use of heat. This bonding technique isn’t performed under low-temperature conditions but is manual process that requires a brush and glue. By contrast, injection molding is a semi-automated process that uses a C-press machine with a heated barrel, metal plates, and tons of pressure. To join cut lengths, uncured rubber is used.

By understanding how these joining processes work, engineers can make better decisions about which types of finished gaskets to choose. It’s also important to understand the advantages of disadvantages of each bonding technique. In this week’s article, we’ll compare cold bonding with injection molding in terms of capabilities, costs, and quantities. (more…)

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Hot Splicing vs. Vulcanizing for Bonded Gaskets

Bonded GasketsHot splicing uses heat, pressure, and a film splice to join the ends of rubber profiles into bonded gaskets. This joining technique uses either a conventional heating source or infrared (IR) light and polyethylene (PE) film. Hot splicing creates strong bonds at the molecular level and generally provides better results than vulcanization, a bonding technique that uses uncured rubber instead of a film splice.

Choosing the best way to bond rubber gaskets can be a complex decision, however. The profile material is just one of many considerations. You also need to consider the size and shape of the seal, production quantities and costs, and the way that lengths of rubber are cut. In addition, it’s important to inspect and install your gaskets properly to ensure reliable sealing and prevent avoidable waste.

Is hot splicing better than vulcanizing for the rubber gaskets that you need? Let’s take a closer look. (more…)

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What’s the Best Way to Bond Rubber Gaskets?

Bonding GasketsRubber profiles come in lengths that are cut-to-size and fabricated into finished gaskets. Examples include picture frame or bezel gaskets, O-rings, and gaskets with rounded corners.

There are four ways to bond or join the ends of rubber profiles.

  • Hot Splicing
  • Vulcanization
  • Cold Bonding
  • Molding

Each bonding or joining method has its advantages, but what’s the best choice for your application? Let’s examine each method in detail so that you can make the right decision. (more…)

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Abrasive Water Jet Cutting vs. Guillotine Cutting for 45° Cuts on Bulb Trim Seals

Abrasive Water Jet CuttingAbrasive water jet cutting and guillotine cutting can both produce 45° cuts on bulb trim seals, industrial rubber products that may contain metal wires. Abrasive water jet cutting uses a high-velocity, high-pressure stream of water and abrasive to cut through rubber, metal, and many other materials. Guillotine cutting uses a miter saw or metal blade instead. Like abrasive water jet cutting, guillotine cutting can cut through rubber profiles that contain metal reinforcements.

For buyers of bulb trim seals, choosing the right cutting method involves a comparison of manufacturing costs. Compared to guillotine cutting, abrasive water jet cutting has higher hourly rates. Yet abrasive water jet cutting can also produce higher volumes of better quality cuts in less time. Cutting a 45° angle is challenging, even for an experienced guillotine operator. If the employee cuts too quickly, the wires won’t cut cleanly. This requires surface finishing, which adds labor costs and extends cycle times.

As this article explains, abrasive water jet cutting can cost less than guillotine cutting for 45° cuts on bulb trim seals. Let’s look at an example to understand why this is the case. (more…)

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Four Ways to Cut Rubber Products

Cut Rubber ProductsWhat’s the best way to cut industrial rubber products like seals, gaskets, and insulation? Manual cutting, die cutting, water jet cutting, and abrasive water jet cutting each offer advantages. They also meet different business and technical requirements. As this article from Elasto Proxy explains, choosing the right cutting method for your application requires a complete and careful analysis. (more…)

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Rubber Gate Seal for Water Filtration System Lasts Longer, Resists Disinfection, Adds Business Value

Water Filtration Case StudyWhen a manufacturer of water filtration systems needed a rubber gate seal that would last longer and resist ultraviolet (UV) light, Elasto Proxy provided a value-added solution. This custom gasket doesn’t just resist exposure to water, contact with metal and concrete, and disinfection with UV light. The gate seal also supports ease-of-installation and is ready to ship from Elasto Proxy’s warehouse in Newmarket, Ontario.

The 60-durometer EPDM lip seal (J-seal) that Elasto Proxy provides attaches to the bottom of a metal gate used in water treatment facilities. This rubber seal is also compressed against hard concrete floors and exposed to a range of temperatures. UV disinfection kills waterborne microbes that can make people sick, but ultraviolet light can also degrade rubber materials. Without reliable sealing and strong bonding, gaskets like this can’t meet business or technical requirements.

To provide a complete sealing solution, Elasto Proxy leveraged its expertise in seal design, material selection, custom fabrication, warehousing, and logistics. (more…)

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Cold Bonding for Rubber Gaskets

Cold BondingCold bonding for rubber gaskets joins lengths of material without the use of heat. This bonding technique doesn’t require low-temperature conditions, but is called “cold” because no heat is applied to the gasket. By contrast, hot splicing requires either a conventional heat source or infrared (IR) light. Vulcanization and molded corners for rubber gaskets also involve heating gasket materials.

With cold bonding, an adhesive is applied to the ends of the lengths that will be joined together. Different types of bonding systems are available, including compounds that vary in terms of viscosity, chemistry, and material properties. Cold bonding for rubber gaskets can save time and eliminate tooling costs, but engineers need a complete understanding of this joining method before choosing glued gaskets. (more…)

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Molded Corners for Rubber Gaskets

Molded Corners for Rubber GasketsMolded corners for rubber gaskets are recommended for applications that require rounded joints, the ability to withstand stretching, or high cycle times. Molding is more expensive than hot splicing or vulcanization, but it’s the only way to create radisued corners. C-press injection molding, a bonding method for rubber gaskets, is ideal for low-to-medium volume quantities but suitable only for solid profiles.

By understanding how C-press injection molding works and the advantages that molded corners provide, engineers can make strong decisions about gasket fabrication. In this article, the second in a series from Elasto Proxy, we’ll continue our coverage of joining methods. Next week’s content, the last in our series, will examine cold bonding. (more…)

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Hot Splicing and Vulcanizing for Rubber Gaskets

Hot Splicing

Hot splicing and vulcanizing for rubber gaskets are bonding techniques that use heat, pressure, and a film splice or uncured rubber to join the ends of profiles. Hot splicing uses thin polyethylene (PE) film and either a conventional heating source or infrared (IR) light. Vulcanization uses an uncured rubber compound, along with heat and pressure. Both hot splicing and vulcanization create chemical bonds at the molecular level.

For engineers, choosing a splicing method for rubber gaskets is an important manufacturing decision. By balancing costs against capabilities, you can get the sealing and insulation solutions that you really need.  Traditional hot splicing, infrared or IR splicing, and vulcanization all have their advantages, but they also have their differences. In this article, the first in a series from Elasto Proxy, we’ll examine each of these bonding techniques in detail. Future articles will cover molded corners and cold bonding. (more…)

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