CANADA 1 800 263-1450 / USA 1 877 228-5906    

Delivering on your needs

Monthly Archives: April 2014

  • CANSEC 2014 – Visit Elasto Proxy in Booth #935

    CANSEC 2014 - Visit Elasto Proxy

    Clyde Sharpe President of International Sales

    Does your company work with Canada’s defense and security industry? Do you want to reach more of a multi-billion-dollar market that includes defense contractors, security firms, and the Canadian military itself? If you’re ready to build your business and make connections that count, then CANSEC 2014 is the place to be on May 29 and 30. Join Elasto Proxy at the EY Centre in Ottawa and visit us in Booth #935.

    Why Attend CANSEC 2014?

    CANSEC 2104 is Canada's leading military technology tradeshow. This year’s two-day event will span 120,000 square feet of indoor exhibits and include an outdoor display. Held at the Ernst & Young Centre in Ottawa, Ontario, CANSEC provides a place where government buyers and industry suppliers can exchange ideas and discuss the latest defense technologies.

    CANSEC is sponsored by the Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI), a trade organization that includes leading defense contractors such as Bombardier. This year’s event will feature over 250 exhibitors and provide valuable networking opportunities with senior government officials.  A private venue, CANSEC 2014 is open only to CADSI members and government personnel.

    Why Visit Elasto Proxy?

    For 25 years, Elasto Proxy has been meeting the needs of the defense and security industry. From experience, we know that Tier 1 and Tier 2 contractorsneed specialized sealing solutions to meet the military’s demands for quality, cost-effectiveness, and performance. In addition to high-quality rubber seals, Elasto Proxy supplies EMI shielding for military electronics, and thermal and acoustic insulation.

    Defense cuts are challenging, but Elasto Proxy believes there are still opportunities for companies who can add value across the supply chain.  For example, because the availability of spare parts is critical, the defense industry needs manufacturers who can make one-off components.  A long-time CADSI member, Elasto Proxy is also the holder of a Controlled Goods Certification (CGC).

    Join the Conversation

    Join Elasto Proxy in Booth #935 as we showcase samples of our high-quality rubber products along with line cards and product catalogs. I’ll be at CANSEC 2014 along with Jason Beattie, Sealing Solutions Provider from our Newmarket, Ontario branch. So bring us your sealing challenges and ask how Elasto Proxy can partner with you to find solutions.

    Even if you can’t attend CANSEC 2014, I hope you’ll comment on this blog entry. Look for a link to it on all of Elasto Proxy’s social media channels: LinkedIn, Facebook, Google+, and Twitter. I hope you’ll subscribeto our e-newsletters, too. They’re a great source of information delivered right to your email inbox, and provide links to blog entries like this one.

  • What’s Really Driving Reshoring?

    Reshoring

    Doug Sharpe President of Elasto Proxy

    Reshoring isn’t just about Made-in-the-USA manufacturing. Here in Canada, where Elasto Proxy is headquartered, we’re also seeing a resurgence in industrial production. As The Globe and Mail reported recently, Canadian exports have reached their highest levels since the 2008 recession. To be sure, these gains would not be possible without strong international demand. Yet the fact remains that Canada, like the United States, is also enjoying a manufacturing renaissance.

    Follow the Leaders

    Is your small-to-medium enterprise (SME) thinking about reshoring? Then consider the example of a larger company, General Electric (GE). When GE Appliances announced in 2012 that it would invest $1-billion to build a new factory in Louisville, Kentucky, company chairman and CEO Jeffrey Immelt called the decision “as risky an investment as we have ever made.” Why would a Harvard Business School MBA take this chance, especially in the wake of the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression?

    General Electric wasn’t looking backwards. Instead, this international conglomerate was looking 5 years ahead. The U.S.-based manufacturer doesn’t have a crystal ball, but GE dared to make predictions about the future of the world’s two largest economies. Capturing current supply chain costs was important, including those of a water heater plant in China. Yet GE also considered the cost of increases in the value of the Chinese Yuan, projected cost increases in global transportation, and the role of process control.

    Push and Pull

    The appliance manufacturer also considered China’s demographics, especially its growing middle class.  As domestic consumption rises, Chinese manufacturers can make more money by serving the domestic market than by exporting low-cost goods. It’s not just a matter of profit margins either. China’s demands for energy and materials are enormous, and the world’s second largest economy wants to devote more resources towards producing goods, such as automobiles, that will meet its own demands.

    GE’s analysis explains the manufacturer’s decision with regard to China, but why build a new factory in the United States? Why not build a plant in Mexico instead, where wages are lower and access to U.S. consumers is still strong? Those who long for a return to low-skilled, hourly-wage factory jobs would do well to take note. As GE explained, its goals for the new Louisville, Kentucky plant mean creating “highly-skilled salaried jobs in fields like engineering, industrial design, and manufacturing.”

    Is The Glass Half-Empty or Half-Full?

    Today, some observers worry that China’s economic growth is slowing – and that the rest of the world will suffer because of changes to this major economy. China’s astronomical growth rates can’t continue indefinitely, however. At the same time, advances in technology and communications will enable more and more of China’s people to achieve Western-style standards of living. Instead of making millions of running shoes for consumers in other nations, China will build 3D printers to support its own industry.

    So how do you tell your best customer that you can’t make the same products for them anymore? How will China address this issue not just with the U.S., but with other trading partners – including Canada? Supposedly, there is a Mandarin curse that says, “May you live in interesting times.” The origins of this saying are unclear (and perhaps untrue), but SMEs who operate globally can live in exciting times if they understand the reasons for reshoring and take advantage of new opportunities.

    Join the Conversation

    If you’d like to learn more about reshoring, I encourage you to visit The Reshoring Initiative on the Web, and to study the efforts of its founder, Harry Mosher.  I hope you’ll comment on this blog entry, too, by looking for a link to it on all of Elasto Proxy’s social media channels: LinkedIn, Facebook, Google+, and Twitter.

    I hope you’ll subscribe to our free e-newsletters as well. They’re a great source of information delivered right to your email inbox, and provide links to blog entries like this one.

  • Giving and Receiving with Centraide Laurentides

    Doug and Donna Sharpe along with Megan Beaulieu and Suzanne Piché, General Manager of Centraide Laurentides. Doug and Donna Sharpe along with Megan Beaulieu and Suzanne Piché, General Manager of Centraide Laurentides.

    Doug Sharpe

    President of Elasto Proxy

    How well do you know your neighbors? Do you greet them when you see them, or do you sometimes pass them by? We’re all so busy these days, and it can be easy to miss what’s going on around us. Yet each of us is also part of a community. As proud as we are of our individual accomplishments, there is room in our lives for helping others.

    Meet Your Neighbors

    Here in the Laurentians, the region north of Montreal that Elasto Proxy calls home, a non-profit group called Centraide Laurentides sees what our neighbors need. By collecting donations from businesses and individuals in and around Boisbriand, Quebec, Centraide Laurentides supports a network of community assistance groups such as food banks, adult literacy programs, and efforts to help teenage mothers.

    Elasto Proxy is proud to support Centraide Laurentides, and encourages others to join us in giving to a good cause. Last September, for example, Elasto Proxy employees walked throughout the industrial park where our company is based, and visited our neighbors door-to-door. We enjoyed discussing Centraide’s fundraising campaign, and hoped that others would also contribute.

    Prizes and Participation

    On behalf of Elasto Proxy, I would like to thank Centraide Laurentides for recognizing our efforts. In addition to a Grand Prize of Excellence for a small enterprise, Elasto Proxy won a platinum certificate for overall participation, which was above 90%. Elasto Proxy employees contribute to Centraide Laurentides via Direct Deposit paycheck deductions, and the company matches these donations by 250%.

    I’m proud that the company Donna Sharpe and I founded 25 years ago is such a strong team, and thank everyone who donated for their generous support. Megan Beaulieu also deserves special mention as she was nominated for a Centraide Campaign Leader award. See the nomination video here. From our September walk through the Tech Park to December’s Family Day event, Team Elasto Proxy finished strong.

    How Can We Help You Help Centraide Laurentides?

    This is the second year in a row that Elasto Proxy has won two Centraide awards, and we will continue to look for ways to deepen our commitment.  If you live or work in or around Boisbriand, Quebec, I hope you will consider supporting Centraide Laurentides, too.

    Do you have questions about how to get involved? Would you like to know more about our experiences with fundraising? Talk to us today. Look for a post with a link to this blog entry on LinkedIn, Facebook, Google+, and Twitter. Elasto Proxy has pages on all of these social media websites, so all that’s missing is you.

    I hope you’ll subscribe to our free e-newsletters as well. They’re a great source of information delivered right to your email inbox, and provide links to blog entries like this one.

  • What If Your Tires Could Talk? Rubber Compounds and Resistance

    IMG Source VehicleMD

    Doug Sharpe President of Elasto Proxy

    Has it been a long, cold winter where you live? Here in Canada, we’re finally enjoying some spring-like weather. There aren’t any flowers yet, but warmer weather is coming. Farmers are probably thinking about tilling the soil, but those of us who don’t drive tractors are considering our cars. Is it time to take off the winter tires and put the summer ones on? Will it snow again? Everyone has an opinion!

    If tires could talk, what would they tell us – not about the weather, but about rubber compounds and resistance? Did you know that there are several different types of rubber in your vehicle’s tires? “There’s a lot riding on your tires”, one well-known TV commercial explains. There’s plenty of chemistry that goes into tire manufacturing, too, and that’s also true of industrial rubber products.

    Let’s Hit the Road

    The results of rubber chemistry roll along whenever you hit the road. Butyl rubber is used for the inside of your tires because it resists gases like air, which is why modern tires are tube-less. EPDM is used for the sidewalls because it resists ozone, which can attack stress points. If you need an example of what ozone can do, check out the dry, cracked tires on an old bicycle.

    Butyl and EPDM aren’t the only rubber compounds in tires, however. The treads are made of natural rubber and two types of synthetic rubber: BR and SBR. Natural rubber and BR rubber provide great abrasion resistance, and have good cut and tear properties. SBR provides traction in the tire’s tread and offers cold-temperature resistance, which is why there’s more SBR rubber in winter tires.

    So Many Materials, So Little Time

    Butyl, EPDM, natural rubber, BR, and SBR are common types of rubber, but they’re not the only ones. Industrial rubber products such as seals, insulation, and hoses have different application requirements than tires. In turn, the rubber that’s used in the fuel hoses at gas stations isn’t recommended for use with medical or food processing equipment. Meanwhile, rubber chemists keep inventing new materials.

    Most engineers don’t need to be rubber experts, but it helps to know something about rubber and resistance – and not just with regard to your vehicle’s tires. Consider chemical and temperature resistance, for example. Neoprene is a common synthetic rubber that resists water, acids, and bases. It also remains flexible over a wide temperature range. That’s why it’s in some automotive seat covers.

    Choosing the Right Rubber

    Choosing the right rubber can be challenging, but hopefully these automotive examples help. In addition to the materials mentioned above, engineers may need to specify nitrile rubber. Nitrile offers good fuel resistance, which is why it’s used in the hoses found at gas stations. There are two types of nitrile: NBR and HNBR. The latter is used for high-temperature applications.

    Hypalon is another rubber you need to know about. Although it’s more expensive than other materials, Hypalon is inert. Along with good chemical resistance, it provides good weathering. If you live in a warm-weather climate, look for Hypalon at the base of water ponds or even reservoirs. Here in Quebec, all we can see on the water right now is snow and ice!

    Specialized Materials

    If tires could talk, they wouldn’t mention silicones. Yet our discussion wouldn’t be complete without addressing these highly-specialized materials. Silicone rubbers are used in medical equipment because they’re inert and clean. They’re also used in electrically-conductive EMI/RFI shielding, something that’s important to customers in the aerospace, defense, and electronics industries.

    Then there are plasticizers used as flame retardants, processing aids, and to increase cold-temperature resistance. They come in oils and waxes, and are added to rubber compounds to impart specific properties. Rubber chemists have also created so many carbon blacks that there’s now a list as long as your arm. In addition to providing color, carbon blacks increase tensile strength and hardness.

    How Can We Help You?

    What questions do you have about rubber compounds and resistance? Do you need help choosing the right rubber for a product or project that you’re working on?  Talk to us today. Look for a post with a link to this blog entry on LinkedIn, Facebook, Google+, and Twitter. Elasto Proxy has pages on all of these social media websites, so all that’s missing is you.

    I hope you’ll subscribe to our free e-newsletters as well. They’re a great source of information delivered right to your email inbox, and provide links to blog entries like this one.

4 Item(s)